Vanquish Studio


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Using a Rubric: How to Measure for Success

Have you ever created a drawing and then looked at it and thought to yourself, “This stinks!”? Well, needless to say, criticizing your art in a negative way is unproductive and not very helpful. We need something to help guide our art-making decisions but in a positive, productive way that helps us grow as an artist. Next time, don’t crumple your art and throw it away. Instead, look at your art through the lens of a rubric!

What is a Rubric?
A rubric is a scoring guide used to evaluate a performance, a product, or a project. We can use a rubric is an assessment tool to evaluate how well we drew our art.

A rubric generally has three parts:
1) performance criteria;
2) rating scale; and
3) indicators.

The rubric defines what is expected and what will be assessed. It indicates what to evaluate, after you draw, according to specific criteria. You can then use that assessment to determine what you need to work on in future drawings and what you have already mastered. If you scored a one in any of the criteria, you know where to focus your efforts for improvement. If you scored a three you know you don’t need to practice that particular skill. Whether you score low or high on a rubric, you still know EXACTLY what you need to do!

Check out the video and download the following rubric for drawing hands and let me know how it worked out for you! Leave a comment or send an e-mail, so I know if you like this content and want me to produce more.

drawing-hands-rubric

 

 

 


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New Video, How to Draw Hands: Foreshortening

Foreshortening is an absolute must if you are going to draw comic book characters AND their hands! I think hands are just as important as the eyes as far as expressiveness and communication. This is the third video in my hand series and it explains the concept of foreshortening and how to use it in drawing.


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How to Draw Eyes: Placing Eyes onto the Face

The eyes are the windows to the soul, which is exactly why they are so hard to draw. Eyes are probably as expressive a feature to drawing a dynamic figure as the hands. This video shows you how to add the eyes to the face and includes a nifty art hack for creating an eye model. You no longer have to ask a friend to stare into space as you draw their eyes. This was a fun video to make. Let me know what you think, helpful? needs work? awesome art hacks? Leave a comment!


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How to Practice Drawing Eyes

Usually, when practicing drawing eyes, the artist will concentrate on one eye (either the left or the right). In this tutorial, I talk about the importance of drawing BOTH eyes! You definitely don’t want to draw one stellar, fantastic eye and then struggle drawing the other one. It will haunt you forever! Check out my latest YouTube video and draw eyes like a pro.


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Best Art Hack for Drawing Dynamic Hands

Drawing the hand can be a daunting task for beginners and professionals alike. Drawing really dynamic hands that tell a story is challenging. How can I improve my hands? Luckily, the bones of the hand make an excellent visual guide when drawing. This art hack video demonstrates the easiest way, I’ve found, to draw those elusive, fluid, interesting hands. Let me know what you think by leaving a comment!


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How Do You Use a Blending Stick (Stump)?

A lot of people look at blending sticks and think, “What the heck is that?” This video demonstrates how to use that funny, white stump that looks like a pencil with no lead. I’m using conte crayon in the video but really you can use a blending stick with many mediums: hard pastel, soft pastel, or graphite pencil. They are especially suited for smaller areas in your drawing that a finger just can’t reach.  


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How to Draw Hands: Basic Construction

What do most people have trouble drawing? Hands! And I don’t blame anyone because I do too! I have researched and experimented with different ways to draw hands. Hands down (I couldn’t resist),  this is the most effective way I have found to draw a hand. I always start with the basic shapes that make up the mass of the hand, mainly the palm, fingers, and the thumb mass.

 

BREAK THE HAND DOWN INTO BASIC SHAPESbasic shape
The two basic shapes I use are a square-like wedge and the cylinder. If you break down the hand into its most basic shape you will notice that the palm is basically a wedge and the fingers are a series of cylinders. When I draw hands, I try to see the most basic shape. Why? It is a lot easier to change the position, size, and proportions of a geometric shape then a fully rendered hand. This is the stage in the drawing process where the artist checks all of those important details before moving on: proportions, positioning, angle, aesthetics, etc.

basic shape2

 

If you look at the hand in its most basic shape you will see these two dominant forms: a square-like wedge and a cylinder. Practice drawing these shapes. Place the wedge in different positions in space and try to draw it.

Also, find a cylindrical shape in your house and practice drawing it in different positions in space. Once you get good at drawing those two basic forms, put them together to draw the basic constructive forms of the hand.

ASSIGNMENT

Download the following worksheet and practice drawing the hand in it’s most basic form. When you get confident enough continue drawing using your non-dominant hand as your model and draw the hand in as many different positions as you can. Practice!

practice-hand-positions

practice-hand-positions