Vanquish Studio


Leave a comment

Working on Gesture

So I decided on a work schedule for myself in my last post which consisted of gesture drawing. So far, its gesture drawinggoing well. I’m not going to try to exaggerate the body as much because I would like to focus on improving my anatomy. Instead, I’m going to work on proportion.

Did you change your focus as well? Did you decide on a new learning target? If you did, welcome to reflective practice! This is how we get better at drawing, fast. Look at your drawings after you draw them and decide if you need to focus more on one thing or move on to something else. Be constructive and not critical. Tearing down your self-esteem isn’t going to make you better at drawing. I realized that I need to have more accurate proportions (head, torso, limbs, etc.) before I even think about exaggerating those same proportions. It makes sense. But did you notice how I didn’t beat myself up about it? I just focused my efforts so I improve the overall product, my drawing. Reflective practice is one of the best ways to improve quickly. Why? It isn’t destructive and self defeating. Instead, it helps focus and build skill. Try it!

I’m still working on gesture and getting the overall proportions correct, and this is only the male figure! Now I need to draw the female figure in gesture too because I feel I need to improve in that department as well. THAT is a lot of drawing. I better get back to work!

sketch end

 


Leave a comment

Look at Your Art Constructively, NOT Critically

We’ve all done it. We rip into our art and say it isn’t any good. Stop the insanity! Look at your art with an objective, constructive eye instead of a critical one. How? Use a rubric!
This video demonstrates how to use a rubric to diagnose where you need to improve and where you don’t to streamline your drawing practice so it’s more effective and efficient.

drawing-hands-rubric


Leave a comment

Using a Rubric: How to Measure for Success

Have you ever created a drawing and then looked at it and thought to yourself, “This stinks!”? Well, needless to say, criticizing your art in a negative way is unproductive and not very helpful. We need something to help guide our art-making decisions but in a positive, productive way that helps us grow as an artist. Next time, don’t crumple your art and throw it away. Instead, look at your art through the lens of a rubric!

What is a Rubric?
A rubric is a scoring guide used to evaluate a performance, a product, or a project. We can use a rubric is an assessment tool to evaluate how well we drew our art.

A rubric generally has three parts:
1) performance criteria;
2) rating scale; and
3) indicators.

The rubric defines what is expected and what will be assessed. It indicates what to evaluate, after you draw, according to specific criteria. You can then use that assessment to determine what you need to work on in future drawings and what you have already mastered. If you scored a one in any of the criteria, you know where to focus your efforts for improvement. If you scored a three you know you don’t need to practice that particular skill. Whether you score low or high on a rubric, you still know EXACTLY what you need to do!

Check out the video and download the following rubric for drawing hands and let me know how it worked out for you! Leave a comment or send an e-mail, so I know if you like this content and want me to produce more.

drawing-hands-rubric

 

 

 


Leave a comment

Seven Steps to Better Drawings!

Every struggling new artist asks her or himself the same question, “How do I get better at drawing?” I’ve complied this list of seven things that anyone can do to get better and to ¬†improve their skill:

  1. DRAW DAILY
    This may sound simple and easy but it’s not! Drawing every day takes time and effort but the payoff is more improved insight into the drawing process and muscle memory. Set aside a time every day when you can sit down and just draw.
  2. DRAW A LOT, NOT NECESSARILY FOR PERFECTION
    All too often people don’t draw because they think their art “just isn’t good enough”. It will never get to the level you want unless you draw a lot. Think of professional athletes who do drills over and over again to get better at a certain skill, drawing is the same way. Keep drawing anything and everything! The more you draw, the better at it you will get.
  3. COPY ARTISTS YOU ADMIRE
    Look at other artists whose art you admire or want to draw like and copy them! It’s always a good idea to look at how other people draw their subjects and try to emulate their style. I’m not saying plagiarize their work, but look at what they do and take what you can use and leave the rest.
  4. INTENTIONAL PRACTICE
    Intentional practice is drawing with the intent of improving a specific area. For example, you may want to draw the figure but you have trouble with the arms in foreshortened view. What should you practice? The arms in foreshortened view! Practice looking at the arm in different positions and from a foreshortened perspective. Choose areas that you could work on and narrow your scope to that particular area. That way, you aren’t needlessly drawing something that you have already mastered. Draw with intention and you will see improvement.
  5. TAKE BREAKS
    I know I said to draw every day, which is a good practice, but also take a break once in awhile. If you are drawing the figure, take a break and concentrate on perspective drawing or draw foliage or animals. Take breaks from what you are drawing because frustration can set in and then you’ll be tempted to stop and that would be disastrous!
  6. ASK FOR FEEDBACK
    This step is critical to growing as an artist. Always ask other people what they think about your drawing. It is always a good idea to have a fresh set of eyes look at your work and tell you where you can improve. Don’t take the criticism personally as if it were directed at you. The feedback is about your art. Keep that in mind and really listen. An outside point-of-view can be a very valuable resource.
  7. DRAW WHAT YOU LIKE
    I’m partial to drawing in the Marvel style rather than manga so that is what I concentrate on the most. If you like drawing animals, draw animals. If you like drawing manga, draw manga. Don’t draw things that you aren’t interested in because that is the quickest way to lose interest and stop drawing.

I hope this list helped you in some way. Now, go forth and draw!